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British Engineer invented an electric car battery that will take you 1,500 miles without charging

A remarkable invention of the new battery for environmentally friendly electric car will soon run up to 1,500 miles without worrying to stop and charge the battery. A British engineer and former Royal Navy officer Trevor Jackson is the man behind this simpler and cheaper battery that can also power buses, huge lorries and even aircraft according to the dailymail report.
       Photo Credit: Dailymail.co.uk
Mr. Jackson currently signed a multi-million-pound deal to start the mass production of the device - and in advance, thanks to the new invention.

Austin Electric now owns the right to use the old Austin Motor Company logo will begin putting it to the electric vehicles next year.

According to Austin’s chief executive, Danny Corcoran, the new technology is a ‘game-changer’."It can help trigger the next industrial revolution. The advantages over traditional electric vehicle batteries are enormous," he added.

Two years ago, Jackson claims, motor manufacturers lobbied the Foreign Office to bar him from a prestigious conference for European businesses and governments at the British embassy in Paris, which was supposed to agree a blueprint for ensuring all new cars are electric by 2040. The bid to exclude him failed. Now, with the signing of the Austin deal, it seems he is finally on the road to success.

Before founding his own firm in 1999, he was working for BAE Systems, where he first started looking at alternative, green ways to power vehicles. By then he and his partner, Kathryn, were married. The couple have eight children, aged 11 to 27, and live in Tavistock, on the edge of Dartmoor in Devon.

In 2001 he began to investigate the potential of a technology first developed in the 1960s. Scientists had discovered that by dipping aluminium into a chemical solution known as an electrolyte, they could trigger a reaction between the metal and air to produce electricity. At that time the method was useless for commercial batteries because the electrolyte was extremely poisonous, and caustic.

After years of experimentation at his workshop in the Cornish village of Callington, Jackson’s eureka moment came when he developed a new formula for the electrolyte that was neither poisonous nor caustic.

‘I’ve drunk it when demonstrating it to investors, so I can attest to the fact that it’s harmless,’ Jackson says. Another problem with the 1960s version was that it worked only with totally pure aluminium, which is very expensive.

But Jackson’s electrolyte works with much lower-purity metal – including recycled drinks cans. The formula, which is top secret, is the key to his device.

Technically, it should be described as a fuel cell, not a battery. Either way, it is so light and powerful that it could now be set to revolutionise low-carbon transport, because it supplies so much energy.

A driver will be able to choose whether to run the car on fossil fuel or electricity. The cost of each conversion, Jackson says, will be about £3,500, and they will be available early next year. This, he adds, will be the stepping-stone to a full-blown electric vehicle powered by aluminium-air fuel cells. The car industry has already poured massive investment into a very different type of battery, lithium-ion.

Source: Dailymail

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